After All This

After All This is an awkward, yet ultimately brave attempt to deal with questions of morality and mortality. The work, which had a short season at this year’s Melbourne Fringe, was created by Elbow Room, who are devising a multi-part work over the next year entitled Now More Than Ever, of which After All This works as both a warm up and a component.

The play is in three parts. The first features two children, played by adult actors, dealing with the early fumblings of religious belief. The second deals with mathematician George Price, and acts as a precursor to the loss of his atheistic ‘faith’, and religious conversion after publishing an equation that attempted to explain the biological and genetic background to the concept of morality. The third deals with a mass suicide in the USA in the late 1990s. In this the cast explains, as a collective, that although their faith is strong enough to go to the ‘next level’, they cannot explain it to those who are not receptive, i.e., the audience.

The initial scene in the play was worrying to me. My pet hate is contemporary theatre and literature using the concept of ‘the child’ as an extended metaphor of some sort of deep seated modern existential crisis. The ultimate culprit of this is Spike Jonze’s Where the Wild Things Are, the ultimate children’s’ movie made for adults terrified of growing up. Both the opening scene of the play and the film make a misconception of the actual behaviour of a child. They do not go through existence with a sense of ‘wonder’; or if they do, seeing a toaster and seeing a unicorn exists on par. Everything is new to them. Surprise and wonder have to be justified to the letter to write from the point of view of a child, or else the purpose behind using someone that age becomes transparent – the writer, timid about becoming profound, worried about expressing any sort of concrete idea about the piece’s themes – mortality, morality, religious life – instead retreats into a manufactured innocence, as if they have forgotten the height and depth of emotions one feels as a child.

That being said, I was immensely relieved when we got on with the rest of the play. Although this withholding of resolution, or at least this lack of bravery in trying to come to terms with the questions being raised, permeated the rest of the scenes, Elbow Room were still posing interesting ideas, and did so with an excellent use of space. The middle scene about the mathematician was especially interesting in the sudden appearance of a Shakespearean ‘fool’, that informed both the audience and ourselves of Price’s fate. Evening out the delivery of some of the lines from the cult members would have been better in the final scenes, but overall – and playing to the impenetrable attitude towards the themes of the play – was effective.

I was greatly encouraged by seeing this production. A lot of contemporary art seems to be lending itself to superficial ideas or pop philosophy to reflect a fear of growing up spiritually. I felt that Elbow Room had the space to really go for it

in order to come to terms with their questioning of the human condition. Instead of pulling their punches, the company has the potential to knock us for six.

Rating: Three stars

After All This
Devised by Elbow Room
Dear Patti Smith, Lv 2, 181 Smith St, Collingwood
September 27 – October 1 

Melbourne Fringe Festival
September 21 – October 9

To see this original article, go here: http://www.artshub.com.au/au/news-article/reviews/performing-arts/after-all-this-185864

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