The Accident

Solo performer Jonno Katz tells the story of two brothers through dance, mime, and onstage transformation with his one man show, The Accident. Sebastian and Roy are brothers, without parents and relying only on each other. Sebastian, the younger brother, is a street statue who is creatively stalling. He turns to Roy, who he worships, to fund a new conceptual installation: a shit machine, a working version of the human digestive system. Roy, who doesn’t see the art but sees dollar signs from commodifying the work, agrees, and proceeds to destroy the integrity of the project by selling off ideas and cutting corners. Meanwhile his girlfriend Emily is distraught at his less than elegant marriage proposal and Sebastian, in an attempt to be the good guy in the situation, makes it so much worse.

Katz is a consummate performer. His use of dance, clowning and physical theatre to dress the story is bold and expressive, often saying more in a few movements than the script itself. His use of a recurring motif – miming an old man with a walker moving towards a light – is a welcome pause in the show, although sometimes this over-enthusiasm for the physical makes the production more elaborate than it needs to be.

Reliance on pre-recorded music is always difficult, especially in a new space, and some of the choices seemed to drown out the meaning of Katz’s movement, or literally drown out some of the spoken word sections. It has obviously been sound-mixed to fill the (at first overwhelmingly) large space, but it is soon demonstrated why such a big venue has been chosen. Katz fills it admirably, but, dressed as he is – and with justification – in a white shirt and black pants, there is always the risk that he is about to plunge into the space and disappear.

The story that is told is interesting, if at times confusing, and juggling the demands of the script as well as the intense physical demands of the piece is a challenge that Katz rises to, but doesn’t always pull off. The portrayal of Emily is frustrating due to her often clichéd construction, which paints her as stupid, shallow and vain. There is more of an emphasis on what she says than physically portraying her relationship to the other characters, whereas a lot was revealed about Roy and Sebastian’s relationship by simply showing Roy stomping along in the park with Sebastian pattering after him.

If the execution of the story of The Accident had been pared down, and had the execution of the piece been a little less ambitious, this would have made for truly enjoyable theatre. As it is, it’s a little overwrought and overdone, but with great potential.

Rating: Three stars

The Accident
Devised and Performed by Jonno Katz
Directed and Choreographed by Irene Sposetti
The Space Dance and Arts Centre, Prahran
September 22 – October 8 

Melbourne Fringe Festival
September 21 – October 9

For the original article go here: http://www.artshub.com.au/au/news-article/reviews/performing-arts/the-accident-185804

The History Operation

The History Operation, playing at the Lithuanian Club during this year’s Melbourne Fringe, is an interesting, if at times overly oblique piece of theatre following a mysterious man’s attempt to unpack a woman’s madness.

Josie is a shut in, completely immersed in a disturbed state that the mysterious Alan is trying to help her out of. Or so he tells Sid, Josie’s suspicious brother, who seems to have only turned up because her rent has gone unpaid and there are bailiffs trying to break the door down. Because of the oblique answers Alan gives, as well as the frequent interruptions of Josie in various states of distress, it becomes more and more unclear as to what is really going on between this trio, and why Sid has come to the house.

I very much enjoyed, to an extent, the vague allusions and inexactness that packed the script. It made the audience something that they are rarely allowed to be in live theatre – detectives within the story. Who exactly is this Alan character; why has the seemingly neglectful Sid appeared; why is Josie trapped in a historical fugue, a fugue that Alan, instead of trying to draw her out of, journeys further into with her? Sid’s accusatory tone towards Alan, unable to believe that someone is capable of acting out of the goodness of their heart, reflects his own feelings of guilt at abandoning his sister, especially when it is hinted that the reason for her madness lies in past wrongdoings on her brother’s part.

This vagueness and allusion, however, ended up going too far. We sat there expecting something a little more to be communicated, for us to be drawn into the story a little more past the initial detective story. If the whole unravelling of the mystery was never to be forthcoming, at least a better depth to the characters could have been given. Admittedly, a fair amount is revealed towards the end of the piece about the source of Josie’s madness, but again the dialogue, almost entirely written in oblique references, made this hard to follow and decidedly anti-climatic. Within this tailed off ending I got smackings of No Exit, or an attempt to hint at it, but with a dearth of hard questions on morality or human action, I was left dissatisfied with the attempt.

Rating: Three stars

The History Operation
Directed by Erin Kelly
Written by Tim Wotherspoon
Lithuanian Club, North Melbourne
September 23 – October 8 

Melbourne Fringe Festival
September 21 – October 9

To see the original article go here: http://www.artshub.com.au/au/news-article/reviews/performing-arts/the-history-operation-185802