Fleur Elise Nobile

 

Visual, and now performance artist Fleur Elise Noble comes over the line from her hotel room in Korea, and we both know we have a task ahead of us; close to the opening of her multi-disciplinary and conceptually diverse show 2 Dimensional Life of Her, a performance which incorporates projections, live action, visual arts and puppetry all in the one space, where do you begin talking about it? Well, how about starting with the obvious, which was why was she calling from Korea? “I’m here on a two week residency, working with digitised art and music, using traditional Korean culture as a basis.” Sounds excellent, and quite far from her background in Adelaide.
“I studied painting and sculpture in Adelaide and then New York. My main focus until two years ago was in drawing, but then I moved into other mediums like animation, puppetry and performance, and from that exploring different ways to bring it all together in a new show.”
That show is 2 Dimensional Life of Her, running out of the always surprising and dynamic Meat Market in mid August as part of the Mobile States program, which is produced by Performing Lines, a touring contemporary performance initiative that targets small production companies and arts practitioners going solo. The initiative favours the more multi-disciplinary and technically ambitious members of the art world, “they kind of knit together the whole tour through other venues throughout Australia, this particular work will have performances in Brisbane, Perth and Hobart. Usually they do Adelaide as well, but since that’s my home town I’ve actually done this show there before.”
The Mobile States project goes for the highly experimental, which is where Noble’s work comes in. Set in her studio, it is a multi disciplinary show about the artist confronting her own work. “It’s a theatre production that’s ninety five percent made out of projection. The intention came from spending so long working with two dimensional artworks. Drawing for me was always about something emerging from nothing, but often when it was exhibited it became about interpretation of the established text, just a final product, a picture hanging on the wall. This was finding a way of bringing people into the space where something is in the process of being made. It’s about the unexpected things that can take place in the process of creation.” This can be seen in the snows of paper that are both handled by the animated puppets in the performance, as well as being used as a projection surface for those selfsame animations. Searching for another explanation she says, “It’s almost like a pop up book, a three dimensional pop up book. All the surfaces are constantly changing. [The performance is] A book with an inside and an outside, so they can become two dimensional objects as well.”
A lot of the projections in the show utilise puppets in the form of stop animation. This painstaking process involves multiple marionettes each with their own coordinated movements. The use of the puppets seems to be an act of separation, an extra stage entered between the conception of the piece and the artist’s final involvement in it. The artist inhabits the construction of the setting, physically assembling the elements of paper, projection and puppetry, but she still allows these elements their own life in the act of performance, which is the point the audience becomes that little bit more than mere spectators.
The use of these figures also highlights what seems to be an increase in the use of puppetry in performances for both adults and children in recent years. “For me it comes out of doing so much sculpture, and wanting to bring those pieces to life. I animate my sculptures, my puppets, then project them during the performance.” A technically challenging performance, how much preparation went into it? “Two years, with lots of different phases, loads of experiments to work out what was possible. This particular show, making the puppets, took ten months full time to put it all together on very little funding, with all the objects made from nothing. It often involved twenty four hour working sessions in places that I’d hired overnight, so it was pretty epic.”
Have you done the show anywhere else before? “Well I just got back from a European tour of the show. I did it at the International Festival of Live Art in Scotland, as well as the Danish Children’s Festival. I mean those are the polar opposite in terms of audiences. [The show] doesn’t just go across mediums, but also audiences, from little kids to high end Arts people.”
And what happens after your show in the Meat Market? “There’ll be a New Zealand tour, then Europe again. After that I’ll be working for five months doing a creative development grant for a new show that will be premiered at the World Theatre Festival at the Powerhouse in Brisbane in February. For that I’m again going to be working on live performance, working on its visual language.” A visual language that seems to be strongly established in 2 Dimensional Life of Her.

Beat Magazine, Issue August 4th, 2010

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